Promoter 59AAG GTG TTT CCC CAA GCC TTT CCC-39. Samples (8 mg

Promoter 59AAG GTG TTT CCC CAA GCC TTT CCC-39. Samples (8 mg) were 1379592 electrophoresed on native polyacrylamide gels with radiolabeled (32P) dsDNA probes, dried on filter paper for 2 h at 80uC, and exposed to BioMax Film (Kodak) at 280uC.IgE-mediated Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis and Latephase Cutaneous ReactionsMast cell-deficient Wsh/Wsh (Wsh) mice were reconstituted locally in the ears and hind paws by intradermal injection of wildtype (left ear and left hind paw) and STXBP1-deficient (right ear and right hind paw) mast cells. Eight weeks later, models of IgEmediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and late-phase cutaneous reactions were evaluated. For IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, Wsh mice with or without (background control) mast cell-reconstitution were sensitized by intradermal injection of 20 ng anti-DNP IgE mAb (Sigma-Aldrich) into each ear. After 24 h, mice were challenged by i.v. injection of 100 mg DNP-BSA in 200 ml of Evan’s blue dye (1 wt/vol; Sigma-Aldrich). Thirty min later, whole ears were collected in 300 ml of formamide and incubated at 80uC for 2 h in a water bath to extract the Evan’s blue dye. The absorbance was determined at 620 nm. For IgE-mediated late-phase cutaneous reactions, mast cell reconstituted-Wsh mice were passively sensitized by i.v. injection of 2 mg anti-DNP IgE mAb (Sigma-Aldrich). After 24 h, a cutaneous reaction was elicited by the application of 20 ml DNFB (0.3 wt/ vol; Sigma-Aldrich) in acetone/olive oil (4:1) to both sides of the hind paw or ear. The thickness of the foot pad or ear was measured using a digital micrometer before and after DNFB treatment 24 h. The thicknesses of the ear or hind paw before DNFB treatment were used as the baseline value. The DNFBinduced increment of tissue thickness was expressed as a MedChemExpress Vasopressin percentage of the baseline values.use the traditional approach of culturing mast cells from bone marrow cells (BMMC, bone marrow-derived mast cell). Instead, livers from the newborn mice in the STXBP1+/2 breeding colony were used to culture mast cells. STXBP1-deficient (STXBP12/2), wild-type (STXBP1+/+), or heterozygous (STXBP1+/2) mice were identified by PCR-based genotyping (Fig. 1A). Each individual experiment was performed using mast cells derived from the litter matched animals. Liver cells were cultured in SCF and IL-3containing media for 4? weeks and examined by metachromatic staining and flow cytometry. No morphological differences were observed between STXBP1-deficient and wild-type mast cells by toluidine blue staining (Fig. 1B). To further characterize the maturation of STXBP12/2 mast cells, we examined the expression level of major mast cell surface markers. IgE sensitized STXBP1+/+ and STXBP12/2 mast cells were stained with antibodies against IgE and c-kit followed by examination by flow cytometry. STXBP1-deficient and wild-type mast cells expressed similar levels of IgE receptor and c-kit (Fig. 1C) suggesting no defect in mast cell maturation in the absence of STXBP1. To determine STXBP1 expression at the protein level, STXBP1+/+ and STXBP12/2 LMC after sensitization with anti-TNP IgE were stimulated TNP-BSA for various times or left untreated (NT). Cells were then lysed and analyzed by Western blot for STXBP1. STXBP1 was detected in STXBP1+/+ mast cells, but not in STXBP12/2 mast cells (Fig. 1D). It 4EGI-1 biological activity appears that TNP-BSA stimulation increased the STXBP1 level. To confirm the absence of STXBP1 gene expression in STXBP12/2 LMCs, as well as to examine the gene e.Promoter 59AAG GTG TTT CCC CAA GCC TTT CCC-39. Samples (8 mg) were 1379592 electrophoresed on native polyacrylamide gels with radiolabeled (32P) dsDNA probes, dried on filter paper for 2 h at 80uC, and exposed to BioMax Film (Kodak) at 280uC.IgE-mediated Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis and Latephase Cutaneous ReactionsMast cell-deficient Wsh/Wsh (Wsh) mice were reconstituted locally in the ears and hind paws by intradermal injection of wildtype (left ear and left hind paw) and STXBP1-deficient (right ear and right hind paw) mast cells. Eight weeks later, models of IgEmediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and late-phase cutaneous reactions were evaluated. For IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, Wsh mice with or without (background control) mast cell-reconstitution were sensitized by intradermal injection of 20 ng anti-DNP IgE mAb (Sigma-Aldrich) into each ear. After 24 h, mice were challenged by i.v. injection of 100 mg DNP-BSA in 200 ml of Evan’s blue dye (1 wt/vol; Sigma-Aldrich). Thirty min later, whole ears were collected in 300 ml of formamide and incubated at 80uC for 2 h in a water bath to extract the Evan’s blue dye. The absorbance was determined at 620 nm. For IgE-mediated late-phase cutaneous reactions, mast cell reconstituted-Wsh mice were passively sensitized by i.v. injection of 2 mg anti-DNP IgE mAb (Sigma-Aldrich). After 24 h, a cutaneous reaction was elicited by the application of 20 ml DNFB (0.3 wt/ vol; Sigma-Aldrich) in acetone/olive oil (4:1) to both sides of the hind paw or ear. The thickness of the foot pad or ear was measured using a digital micrometer before and after DNFB treatment 24 h. The thicknesses of the ear or hind paw before DNFB treatment were used as the baseline value. The DNFBinduced increment of tissue thickness was expressed as a percentage of the baseline values.use the traditional approach of culturing mast cells from bone marrow cells (BMMC, bone marrow-derived mast cell). Instead, livers from the newborn mice in the STXBP1+/2 breeding colony were used to culture mast cells. STXBP1-deficient (STXBP12/2), wild-type (STXBP1+/+), or heterozygous (STXBP1+/2) mice were identified by PCR-based genotyping (Fig. 1A). Each individual experiment was performed using mast cells derived from the litter matched animals. Liver cells were cultured in SCF and IL-3containing media for 4? weeks and examined by metachromatic staining and flow cytometry. No morphological differences were observed between STXBP1-deficient and wild-type mast cells by toluidine blue staining (Fig. 1B). To further characterize the maturation of STXBP12/2 mast cells, we examined the expression level of major mast cell surface markers. IgE sensitized STXBP1+/+ and STXBP12/2 mast cells were stained with antibodies against IgE and c-kit followed by examination by flow cytometry. STXBP1-deficient and wild-type mast cells expressed similar levels of IgE receptor and c-kit (Fig. 1C) suggesting no defect in mast cell maturation in the absence of STXBP1. To determine STXBP1 expression at the protein level, STXBP1+/+ and STXBP12/2 LMC after sensitization with anti-TNP IgE were stimulated TNP-BSA for various times or left untreated (NT). Cells were then lysed and analyzed by Western blot for STXBP1. STXBP1 was detected in STXBP1+/+ mast cells, but not in STXBP12/2 mast cells (Fig. 1D). It appears that TNP-BSA stimulation increased the STXBP1 level. To confirm the absence of STXBP1 gene expression in STXBP12/2 LMCs, as well as to examine the gene e.