En combined with less physical activity, there has been a worsening

En combined with less physical activity, there has been a worsening risk factor profile in post-war generations (men in particular), who are at higher risk of obesity and possess higher prevalence of several other chronic disease risk factors (Todoriki et al. 2004; Willcox et al. 2012) versus previous generations and other Japanese. The contrast is particularly stark when viewed from a generational perspective. In two generations Okinawans have gone from the lowest BMI to the highest BMI among the Japanese population (Willcox et al, 2007). As a consequence, there has been a Isovaleryl-Val-Val-Sta-Ala-Sta-OH web resurgence of interest from public health professionals in the health enhancing effects of the traditional Okinawan diet and a movement to re-educate younger persons in eating a more traditional dietary pattern. Other similar movements exist in Japan, such as the slow food movement, and in America, such as the Oldways movement (www.oldways.org). All share in common a mission to educate the public about the health, family, and societal benefits of traditional diets. In conclusion, the Okinawan diet, particularly the traditional diet represents a real-world dietary pattern that is among the healthiest in the world of traditional diets. While the food choices are more common to Asian diets, it shares many of the nutritional characteristics of other healthy traditional (Mediterranean) and modern diets (DASH, Portfolio) and is good choice for those who have a taste for healthy Asian cuisine and wish to embark on a path toward healthier aging.Mech Ageing Dev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 April 24.Willcox et al.Page
Hexanoyl-Tyr-Ile-Ahx-NH2 biological activity Anxiety and fear in children during dental treatment has been subjected for many studies. Den-JODDD, Vol. 9, No. 3 SummerSelf-concept and Dental Anxiety and Behavioranxiety could be potentially challenging for the both child and dentist, which can have considerable implication for the child, dental team, and dental service and also hinder child’s cooperation for treatment.4 Low cooperative behaviors in children make the dental treatment difficult and may alter the treatment plan. Furthermore, excessive anxiety can cause more pain perception by the child and reduce the child’s motivation to return and attend the necessary dental treatments.5 Different factors affect children’s behavior during dental treatment, some of which include temperament, social class, age, and psychological and behavioral characteristics.6 Self-concept, also called self-construction, selfidentity or self-perspective is a multi-dimensional construct that refers to an individual’s perception of “self” in relation to any number of characteristics, such as gender, sexuality, racial identity, and many others.7,8 The self-concept is an internal model which encompasses self-assessments included -but is not limited to- personality, skills and abilities, occupation(s) and hobbies, physical characteristics, and etc.9 In the other word, self-concept contains three parts: self-esteem, stability, and self-efficacy. Selfesteem is the “evaluative” component, where one makes judgments about his or her self-worth, which means positive or negative evaluations of the self.10,11 Stability refers to the organization and continuity of one’s self-concept. Self-efficacy is best explained as self-confidence and is specifically connected with one’s abilities, unlike self-esteem.11 During early childhood self-concept develops and attributes, abilities, attitudes, and the values are established. By age 3 (.En combined with less physical activity, there has been a worsening risk factor profile in post-war generations (men in particular), who are at higher risk of obesity and possess higher prevalence of several other chronic disease risk factors (Todoriki et al. 2004; Willcox et al. 2012) versus previous generations and other Japanese. The contrast is particularly stark when viewed from a generational perspective. In two generations Okinawans have gone from the lowest BMI to the highest BMI among the Japanese population (Willcox et al, 2007). As a consequence, there has been a resurgence of interest from public health professionals in the health enhancing effects of the traditional Okinawan diet and a movement to re-educate younger persons in eating a more traditional dietary pattern. Other similar movements exist in Japan, such as the slow food movement, and in America, such as the Oldways movement (www.oldways.org). All share in common a mission to educate the public about the health, family, and societal benefits of traditional diets. In conclusion, the Okinawan diet, particularly the traditional diet represents a real-world dietary pattern that is among the healthiest in the world of traditional diets. While the food choices are more common to Asian diets, it shares many of the nutritional characteristics of other healthy traditional (Mediterranean) and modern diets (DASH, Portfolio) and is good choice for those who have a taste for healthy Asian cuisine and wish to embark on a path toward healthier aging.Mech Ageing Dev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 April 24.Willcox et al.Page
Anxiety and fear in children during dental treatment has been subjected for many studies. Den-JODDD, Vol. 9, No. 3 SummerSelf-concept and Dental Anxiety and Behavioranxiety could be potentially challenging for the both child and dentist, which can have considerable implication for the child, dental team, and dental service and also hinder child’s cooperation for treatment.4 Low cooperative behaviors in children make the dental treatment difficult and may alter the treatment plan. Furthermore, excessive anxiety can cause more pain perception by the child and reduce the child’s motivation to return and attend the necessary dental treatments.5 Different factors affect children’s behavior during dental treatment, some of which include temperament, social class, age, and psychological and behavioral characteristics.6 Self-concept, also called self-construction, selfidentity or self-perspective is a multi-dimensional construct that refers to an individual’s perception of “self” in relation to any number of characteristics, such as gender, sexuality, racial identity, and many others.7,8 The self-concept is an internal model which encompasses self-assessments included -but is not limited to- personality, skills and abilities, occupation(s) and hobbies, physical characteristics, and etc.9 In the other word, self-concept contains three parts: self-esteem, stability, and self-efficacy. Selfesteem is the “evaluative” component, where one makes judgments about his or her self-worth, which means positive or negative evaluations of the self.10,11 Stability refers to the organization and continuity of one’s self-concept. Self-efficacy is best explained as self-confidence and is specifically connected with one’s abilities, unlike self-esteem.11 During early childhood self-concept develops and attributes, abilities, attitudes, and the values are established. By age 3 (.