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N. To address the needs of the growing number of older people and their caregivers, the Japanese government implemented the National Long-Term Care Insurance Program (LTCI). This policy, implemented in 2000, has had far-reaching effects on older people with POR-8 molecular weight dementia and their caregivers. For example, dementia-specific day care and dementia group homes have increased significantly under the LTCI (Tamiya et al., 2011). Informal supports,Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptDementia (London). Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 July 01.Ingersoll-Dayton et al.Pagesuch as volunteer dementia support programs, have also become more prevalent. However, clinical research focusing on interventions for persons with dementia and their caregivers has received relatively little attention in Japan.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptOur cross-fertilization processThe process by which we developed the Couples Life Story Approach can best be described in three phases: the original couples narrative project, a HMPL-013 dose literature review, and the development of the present intervention. Original couples narrative project Our interest in couples-oriented work was inspired by a cross-cultural research project in which several of the present authors from Japan and the United States were involved (Ingersoll-Dayton, Campbell, Kurokawa, Saito, 1996). To understand more about marriages in later life in Japan and the United States, we used an open-ended interview format in which we asked older couples to tell us the story of their lives together. As interviewers, we met conjointly with each couple and listened to a historical account of their marriage from when they first met until the present time. These couples were not dealing with dementia, but their stories resulted in rich narratives revealing shared perspectives on their married lives. Although these couples-oriented interviews were not designed as an intervention, we received feedback from our research participants about their therapeutic value. Couples told us how much they benefitted from having the opportunity to review their lives together. They also observed that it was especially meaningful to reminisce with an interested listener. In addition, they appreciated being able to share the tapes and transcripts that resulted from our interviews with their family members. Taken together, these observations from the research participants pointed to the potential benefits of an intervention for older couples that used a story-telling approach. Literature review Our interest in developing an intervention for couples was further inspired by the small but growing body of literature in the United States that focuses on dyadic approaches where one person has dementia. The interventions described in the Moon and Adams (2013) review article are group, psychoeducation, and skill-building dyadic approaches. The intervention we developed drew on two other dyadic models: a life review approach and a legacy therapy approach. Using a structured life review approach, Haight et al. (2003) interviewed couples where one person had memory loss. Life Story Books were created for each member of the couple based on separate interviews with the caregiver and the person with memory loss. Haight and her colleagues (2003) found that caregivers experienced decreased feelings of burden while the individuals with memory loss evinced more positive moods following the li.N. To address the needs of the growing number of older people and their caregivers, the Japanese government implemented the National Long-Term Care Insurance Program (LTCI). This policy, implemented in 2000, has had far-reaching effects on older people with dementia and their caregivers. For example, dementia-specific day care and dementia group homes have increased significantly under the LTCI (Tamiya et al., 2011). Informal supports,Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptDementia (London). Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 July 01.Ingersoll-Dayton et al.Pagesuch as volunteer dementia support programs, have also become more prevalent. However, clinical research focusing on interventions for persons with dementia and their caregivers has received relatively little attention in Japan.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptOur cross-fertilization processThe process by which we developed the Couples Life Story Approach can best be described in three phases: the original couples narrative project, a literature review, and the development of the present intervention. Original couples narrative project Our interest in couples-oriented work was inspired by a cross-cultural research project in which several of the present authors from Japan and the United States were involved (Ingersoll-Dayton, Campbell, Kurokawa, Saito, 1996). To understand more about marriages in later life in Japan and the United States, we used an open-ended interview format in which we asked older couples to tell us the story of their lives together. As interviewers, we met conjointly with each couple and listened to a historical account of their marriage from when they first met until the present time. These couples were not dealing with dementia, but their stories resulted in rich narratives revealing shared perspectives on their married lives. Although these couples-oriented interviews were not designed as an intervention, we received feedback from our research participants about their therapeutic value. Couples told us how much they benefitted from having the opportunity to review their lives together. They also observed that it was especially meaningful to reminisce with an interested listener. In addition, they appreciated being able to share the tapes and transcripts that resulted from our interviews with their family members. Taken together, these observations from the research participants pointed to the potential benefits of an intervention for older couples that used a story-telling approach. Literature review Our interest in developing an intervention for couples was further inspired by the small but growing body of literature in the United States that focuses on dyadic approaches where one person has dementia. The interventions described in the Moon and Adams (2013) review article are group, psychoeducation, and skill-building dyadic approaches. The intervention we developed drew on two other dyadic models: a life review approach and a legacy therapy approach. Using a structured life review approach, Haight et al. (2003) interviewed couples where one person had memory loss. Life Story Books were created for each member of the couple based on separate interviews with the caregiver and the person with memory loss. Haight and her colleagues (2003) found that caregivers experienced decreased feelings of burden while the individuals with memory loss evinced more positive moods following the li.

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Author: haoyuan2014